Accreditation Public Comment System




DocumentSectionItemFirst NameLast NameGroup NameComment 
Master's Accreditation IRs (Section C) Implementing Regulation (IR) C-7 M. Program Aims and Program-Specific CompetenciesCarolynnKohn This seems like an excellent fit with the training some students receive in applied behavior analysis, with an emphasis on behavior change in the area of health behaviors. I can see this having a very positive impact, especially in the area of primary care.
Master's Accreditation IRs (Section C) Implementing Regulation (IR) C-8 M. Profession-Wide Competencies RebeccaMeacham Some state legislatures are "outlawing" these very teachings (e.g. privilege) for state funded programs.
Master's Accreditation IRs (Section C) Implementing Regulation (IR) C-8 M. Profession-Wide Competencies ScottYoung As I also note elsewhere, I believe it should be clarified that the "relevant supervision requirements for one's practice level" should include substantial emphasis on supervision of master's level HSP by doctoral licensed psychologists. This should be emphasized both pre-degree and post-degree.
Master's Accreditation IRs (Section C) Implementing Regulation (IR) C-8 M. Profession-Wide Competencies ScottYoung I would also add that I find section VI: Assessment an unclear section. I'm not sure what level of focus or training is being applied to psychometrics, psychological testing, neuropsychological testing, etc. I would encourage clarification of how much a competence focus this area includes, and a description of how those from this program would interact in testing with doctoral level psychologists.
Master's Accreditation IRs (Section C) Implementing Regulation (IR) C-9 M. Diversity Education and Training TammyMcClain "Programs are expected to train students to be competent not only for serving diverse individuals present in their local community and training setting, but also for working with diverse individuals they may encounter when they move to other locations after completion of their training." Can students demonstrate competence if their didactic training has covered a broad range of diversity factors, but their training setting has fewer opportunities for applying their knowledge of diversity? While I wholeheartedly agree with this competency, I am concerned about rural areas that may have fewer opportunities for students to encounter certain aspects of diversity.
Master's Accreditation IRs (Section C) Implementing Regulation (IR) C-9 M. Diversity Education and Training PatrickQuinn I read the standards with great interest. I concur with everything proposed. I live in North Carolina, where master's trained "psychologists" practice as Licensed Psychological Associates, who require supervision at some level throughout their careers. The system works really well in providing well trained providers for state funded programs, Medicaid and some BC/BS insured, but the big problem is some other insurances, take the supervision requirement to mean "not fully licensed yet". If there is not a resolution to this issue, the good work of this project will not meet the public's need for increasing the availability of well trained and qualified master's trained psychologists.
Master's Accreditation IRs (Section C) Implementing Regulation (IR) C-12 M. Clinical Experiences Guidelines for Master’s ProgramsHeatherNoble Among the guidelines to clarify the CoA's expectations, the second and third bullet points appear to indicate supervision must include a licensed psychologist? Does this mean that other licensed professionals (e.g., licensed professional counselors) could not be supervisors for master's programs' clinical experiences?
Master's Accreditation IRs (Section C) Implementing Regulation (IR) C-12 M. Clinical Experiences Guidelines for Master’s ProgramsMichaelReed Under this section it is not explicitly clear that an independent Master's level practitioner (i.e., Lic. Psychological Associate) could be a supervisor. Bullet point 3 makes mention of "on-site psychologists..." Many rural states such as mine, struggle to find clinicians willing to be supervisors. LPAs for example are under the same ethics code and licensing board as psychologists. They have had 2-yrs of supervision by a psychologist before being independently licensed. I also think those who achieved a doctorate in clinical, counseling, and/or school psychology who maintain another type of license, could be appropriate supervisors (e.g., PsyD with an LPC). I don't think a person who person who has an LPC and was never socialized in psychology would be an appropriate overall supervisor. Some masters programs posit that "counseling and psychology" are essentially different fields and an additional issue is counselors have usually only studied the ACA code of ethics and not the APA.
Master's Accreditation IRs (Section C) Implementing Regulation (IR) C-12 M. Clinical Experiences Guidelines for Master’s ProgramsScottYoung I agree that it makes sense for these master's trainees to be able to be supervised by psychology predoc interns (themselves under supervision), psychology postdocs (themselves under supervision), and licensed psychologists. I do not believe that more than 20% of their supervision should occur with "master's level practitioners in HSP". In this regard, I must respectfully disagree with colleagues who believe that psychologist supervision excessively limits to availability of supervision for these trainees. That is part of the reason why I feel telesupervision should be more permissible than the 50% restriction current suggeted. The following are concerns raised by opening the supervision door too widely: 1). At some point, if we allow master's level supervision too broadly, what is the difference between a master's HSP and a mental health counselor? Having psychologist supervision becomes critical in providing the breadth and depth of supervision needed to practice psychology a... See Full Comment
Master's Accreditation IRs (Section C) Implementing Regulation (IR) C-13 M. Telesupervision MichaelReed I would strongly urge CoA to eliminate the requirement of only "50% of total supervision" be allowed for tele-supervision or restrict its use in anyway. We have discovered in the last year that as psychologists we can deliver high-quality psychological services and education via a tele-delivery means without a reduction in outcome. Again by allowing tele-supervision it creates access for more rural programs to expand their practicum/internship opportunities. From this supervisor's perspective there is no good reason to limit the access of this medium. I don't need to be physically in a room anymore to offer good supervision or for the trainee to meaningfully benefit from this supervision. However, all other requirements of this IR are appropriate.
Master's Accreditation IRs (Section C) Implementing Regulation (IR) C-13 M. Telesupervision MariaOkon I would urge CoA to eliminate or modify the requirement of only "50 % of total supervision" be allowed for tele-supervision. In this last year, psychologists have been able to continue to provide high quality psychological services and education/supervision via tele-delivery outlets. By allowing tele-supervision, it creates increased access to services by students, thus allowing more flexibility to ensure and to provide quality patient care.
Master's Accreditation IRs (Section C) Implementing Regulation (IR) C-13 M. Telesupervision EduardoBunge I agree with most colleagues. Please remove the 50% requirement. We have seen how we can provide good quality supervision via teletherapy. If clients will want to have teletherapy it makes no sense to consider telesupervision as something worse than in-person.
Master's Accreditation IRs (Section C) Implementing Regulation (IR) C-13 M. Telesupervision ScottYoung I tend to agree with my colleagues. While I acknowledge, and agree, that in-person supervision is desirable with unique benefits, I do not believe it is defensible to require ANY amount during public health emergencies. So I believe an exception should be added for that if an in-person percentage is to be required. I would also support a lower percentage (maybe around 20-30%) with the aforementioned exception. Rural areas would benefit from allowing a psychologist to provide supervision via telesupervision, and I believe that to be a higher priority (doctoral psychologist supervision) than the medium.